Spring 2015 Events

Note: additional events will be added as the Spring Colloquium Series is finalized.

Monday, January 26, 2015 | 12pm - 1pm

Peter Philips

The Impact of Illness Prevention Policies on Statewide Injury Rates in U.S. Construction

Peter Philips, Professor, Economics, University of Utah; IRLE Visiting Scholar

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) asserts that Injury and Illness Prevention Programs (IIPPs) dramatically reduce workplace injuries. OSHA predicts that individual employers adopting IIPPs will experience as much as a 35 percent drop in injuries, and statewide adoption of mandatory IIPPs would result in a 12 percent decline. While critics concede that voluntary IIPPs can substantially reduce firm-level injury rates, weak and limited literature on state-level IIPP policies fails to show that mandatory IIPPs reduce injuries. A fixed effects panel data model of injury rates in U.S. construction from 1982 to 2008 shows that controlling for confounding factors including changes in reporting culture, long term trends in injury reduction, business cycle and other economic factors, mandatory IIPPs reduce total construction injury rates by 32 percent and lost workday injuries by 38 percent in areas of low union density. As construction union density rises, the impact of IIPPs declines. The relatively weak impact of both mandatory and quasi-voluntary IIPPs in more heavily unionized construction is explained by the greater prevalence of joint union-management training programs which provide practices and procedures similar to those promoted by IIPPs.

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Monday, February 9, 2015 | 11 am - 12 pm

Joe Stiglitz

To Be Announced

Joe Stiglitz

Joseph Eugene Stiglitz is an American economist and a professor at Columbia University. He is a recipient of the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences and the John Bates Clark Medal.

 

Monday, February 9, 2015 | 12 pm - 1 pm

Damon Silvers

Raising Wages— Why Our Nation's Future Depends on Rebuilding Workers' Bargaining Power

Damon Silvers, Director of Policy and Special Counsel for the AFL-CIO

Co-sponsored with the Center for Labor Research and Education

Mr. Silvers serves on a pro bono basis as a Special Assistant Attorney General for the state of New York. Damon Silvers led the successful efforts to restore pensions to the retirees of Cannon Mills lost in the Executive Life collapse and the severance owed to laid off Enron and WorldCom workers following the collapse of those companies. Mr. Silvers received his J.D. with honors from Harvard Law School.

 

Monday, February 23, 2015 | 12 pm - 1 pm

Ming Leung

For love or money? Gender differences in how one approaches getting a job

Ming Leung, Assitant Professor, Haas

Extant supply-side labor market theories conclude that women and men apply to different jobs but are unable to explain gender differences in how they may behave when applying to the same job. By comparison, demand-side theories implicate employer behaviors to explain both between and within-job variation in outcomes. We correct this discrepancy by considering gendered approaches to the hiring process. We propose that applicants can apply for a job and emphasize either the relational or the transactional aspects of entering such an exchange relationship and that this affects whether they are hired. Relational job seekers focus on developing a social connection with their employer. In contrast, transactional job seekers focus on quantitative aspects of the job. We expect women to be more relational and men to be more transactional and that this behavior will contribute to differences in hiring outcomes. We examine behaviors in an online contract labor market for graphic designers, Elance.com where we find that women are more likely to be hired than men by about 9.5%. Quantitative linguistic analysis on the unstructured text of job proposals reveals that women (men) adopt more relational (transactional) language in their applications. These different approaches affect a job seeker’s likelihood of being hired and attenuate the gender gap we identified. Attenuation suggests that how one approaches the hiring process matters and that gender is correlated with a particular style of engagement.

 

Monday, March 9, 2015 | 12 pm - 1 pm

Christina Banks

How an Interdisciplinary View of Healthy Workplaces is Greater than the Sum of the Parts.

Christina Banks, Professor, Haas Management of Organization Groups, Director, Interdisciplinary Center for Healthy Workplaces

 

All events are located at the Institute for Research on Labor and Employment, 2521 Channing Way, Berkeley.

TO ATTEND AN EVENT, PLEASE R.S.V.P. Myra Armstrong, zulu2@berkeley.edu